Behind the Scenes-November 2017

leaves in Portland

Autumn Leaves

The Wylie Art Gallery workroom filled to capacity on a hot October day in Texas for our “Ask the Authors” panel and discussion during OktoberFest. The bratwurst smelled delicious, as it cooked outdoors on the other side of the street.  Several of the artists who show their work in the gallery attended our discussion and Open House which followed.

The crowd asked great questions and participated well. Comments from the audience proclaimed they found value from the four of us. One lady said, “I’m leaving very encouraged. I can do it. It’s taken me 40 years to decide how much I really want to write a book.”

Ask the Authors

Fred speaks frankly!

Ruth Wharton, author of The Valentine Symphony (romance) began the panel discussion with a short version of “Getting Started.” Roger Geiger, author of Face the Bear (adventure) talked about “Time Management,” a huge issue for all authors. My book had 62 possible titles before Gift of the Suitcase (travel memoir) was suggested; therefore, I talked about whether to name the book before or along the way. Fred Holmes, author of Return to Sender (time travel) gave his insight on finding a publisher or self-publishing. He emphasized writers must have a good story to tell and an excellent knowledge of basic punctuation and grammar.

Thanks go to Cheryl Mabry, Director of the Wylie Art Gallery for co-sponsoring the “Ask the Authors” panel on October 14. Thanks to Mike Felix, Mayor of Sachse for taking time to facilitate the presentation. Thanks to Jackie Cestarte and Caron Hughes for helping with communication and social media. The Sachse-Wylie Authors Group will meet early in November to discuss our format for the participants who registered interest.

We’ve been invited to return 12/2/2017 for a repeat performance. That’s the day the  Wylie Baptist Church holds a fabulous annual Holiday Craft Show across the street from the Wylie Art Gallery on Ballard Street.

The Sachse-Wylie Authors Group will meet early in November to discuss our format for the participants who registered interest.

By the way, if you cannot think what to get your aunt or grandma, your friend or someone going through change, think about ordering my book, Gift of the Suitcase. It’s a quick read with an inspiring message.

Do you know?

If you haven’t investigated the Books tab on my website, please do. The drop-down box allows you to find books you may want to order and read.  The first drop-down box offers more insight about Gift of the Suitcase. The second drop-down mentions MORE than a Paycheck, an excellent gift for anyone going through career and job change. I talked to a police officer recently who will retire soon. He already has a construction company he started ten years ago and will increase his hours. That’s the way to do it!

The third drop-down box provides suggested reading: World War II and the Holocaust, others about writing,  I often add and delete books.

Upcoming Event(s)

The Sachse-Wylie Authors Group meets at Sachse First United Methodist Church in Sachse November 1  to discuss a re-organization.

Private book club-discussion of Gift of the Suitcase-November 27, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paperweights: An Uncommon Hobby

paperweights

Photo by Ruth Glover

 

When I went to my first paperweight meeting, I didn’t know how addicted I would become to my uncommon hobby. Paperweight history and glass technology fascinate me.

Do you know hobbies are healthy for us? Do you work all the time? I’m not trying to persuade you to collect paperweights but to discover an endeavor that will bring you together with others where you meet people with similar passions. I had no idea, when I went to my first paperweight meeting, the complexity of the art.

I’m a card-carrying member of an organization for paperweight enthusiasts, but I must depend on people in my Paperweight Collectors Association of Texas for their vast knowledge. Although I’ve learned a tremendous amount, my knowledge fits in a coffee cup or maybe a thimble. Now I’m sharing my “coffee cup” with you.

Our meetings include presentations from dealers and artists. The added plus, we meet new friends who love to travel, chat, and dine together. The meetings are devoted to helping the group understand the complexity of the art. Let’s start with the basics.

Antique Paperweights

According to research, glass making began in the Middle East as long ago as 4000 BC. But let’s concentrate on more recent progress.

In an online history of paperweights, the author mentions Pietro Bigaglia, from Venice, Italy, who brought the first known paperweight to a meeting in Austria in 1845. The leaders at the St. Louis Glass Manufacturing Company in France began creating similar paperweights. Soon Baccarat, another French glass manufacturing company in France, followed. The antique paperweights often cost much more than the newer weights.

Perhaps a paperweight catches your eye in an antiques store. The price tag is $1500. Is it a good investment? If you watch the Antiques Road Show, you discover antiques can improve their value and others, not so much. For paperweights, it depends on the quality of the actual piece: pristine clarity of color, success of the artist, shape, and finish. Paperweight popularity rises and declines with the economy.

Emerging Artists

paperweight

A MacNaught Paperweight

Since the 1940s American paperweight makers blossomed with methods to differentiate themselves. We call them “emerging” artists. Several styles include the millefiori or lamp work methods.

 Millefiori

Millefiori (a thousand flowers) involves heating, cooling and cutting glass rods or canes. The artist inserts beautifully coordinated colorful canes in concentric patterns. Canes may look like tiny flowers, especially the rose canes. A scramble appears as it sounds: the small pieces of glass, which look a little like Christmas candy, are mixed and covered in clear glass.

Lamp Work, Flame Work and Torch Work

Ken Rosenfeld’s lamp work, for example, shows the most brilliant hues of both fruit and flowers encased in glass clearer than icy, mountain water. Although a tiny bouquet may look like straw, the entire paperweight is glass. According to one of the most respected paperweight authorities, Art Elder:

“Lamp work originated as a product of sculpting glass using the heat of a whale-oil lamp normally, used for reading. Flame work and torch work, modern terms, originated when glass became sculpted with modern fuels and torches.”

The Un-Ending Story

As the Chinese become better with their manufacturing of paperweights, the novice enthusiast must be careful to avoid purchasing counterfeits. I am not “hung up”

on paperweight values when I add to my collection. A dear friend recognized my addiction and gave me an inexpensive, Chinese weight with a pink flower, which I treasure. I love the paperweight I bought at the Corning Glass Museum  gift shop created by The Glass Eye manufacturing firm in Seattle. It reminds me of a Monet painting. In Dallas the Carlyn Galerie carries the Glass Eye brand (GES on the bottom) and other less famous artists. If you are looking for an exquisite, reasonably priced object for a gift, check out retail gift shops. You may find a heart-shaped paperweight to bring joy to a friend. Kittrell/Riffkind Art Glass offers an array of art glass, including paperweights by emerging artists. Google “art glass near me” and you may find an unexpected treasure.

Click on the Paperweight Collectors of Texas website for information about our next meeting in Houston in early March. Another website for detail is the Paperweight Collectors Association, the national organization for people with a crazy affinity for paperweights as a serious art form. And if you are in an antiques store, be sure to look for paperweights. You may find a rare treasure.

A Chance To Meet The Artists

blue paperweight

Completed totally with glass by Mayauel Ward

I accidentally saw a post on Facebook from Mayauel Ward, a paperweight artist from California who makes glass art and paperweights. He mentioned casually he would be at the Bayou City Art Fair in Houston on March 27 through March 29. Since my husband and I would be visiting relatives in Houston, maybe we could go. Little did I realize the size of this art bonanza. As I researched online, I discovered over 450 artists would attend. The location, convenient in Memorial Park near downtown Houston, is a beautifully treed area. The day would be hot and parking, a problem. I became determined to attend. Fortunately, Mayauel posted the number of his booth, as finding him in the midst of 449 others, would be daunting.

Paperweights

I collect paperweights. How that happened is another story, but I love them and belong to the Paperweight Collectors Association of Texas. When our non-profit organization meets, an artist and a paperweight dealer attend, so we can whet our passion for education about paperweights, usually going home with glass balls wrapped carefully by the attending dealer.

Mayauel has not yet visited our group. This was my chance to meet him and hear his story. Plus, I’d check as many other artists’ booths as possible, although with family members hovering near, doting over other booths was not practical.

Bayou City Art Fair

Since I ran late, the three of us arrived an hour after the gates opened. By this time we had to walk a million miles to the entrance. My feet hurt and the weather became horridly humid and hot. We trudged forward to find Mayauel’s booth. I picked up a number of business cards in the other glass art booths, but once I found his booth, I didn’t need to go farther. I found two phenomenally gorgeous weights, reasonably priced. I wanted to hear more about his journey into paperweight making but with the heat, the waiting son and grand-son, Mayauel and I didn’t talk long. Plus, many customers waited to talk with him and buy his art treasures.

Mayauel Ward

You can read about his journey on his website. He’s been an artist most of his life, working in places where he trained with experts to improve his creativity. He started his own business in 1988, often visiting art fairs. Be sure to visit his website at www.mayauelglass.com to see, not only paperweights but his fabulous, colorful vases and other items. Read about his career from surfer dude to incredibly talented glass artist on his website.

Advice

Never be late to art fairs, if parking is a problem. Know which artists you want to visit beforehand or you may waste time searching for him or her. Artists enjoy meeting and talking with you. You may not have to travel to places like California or Vermont to discover the latest, most fascinating artists. The next big art fair in the Dallas area is Cottonwood Art Festival in Richardson, Texas May 2-3.

Don’t wait until the scorching temperatures of summer to visit the local art fairs. Go now. If you wait a minute in Texas, the weather may no longer be conducive for your fun!

Addition Information

Or…attend the next meeting of the Paperweight Collectors Association of Texas to meet other crazy collectors, like me! See www.pcatx.org for details.