A Passion for Performance

Robin Read’s Performers Add Joy to the Christmas Season

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Robin Read

Everyone in the tiny town in upper New York state knew little Robin. In elementary school, she decided to be a singer. Family encouraged her. At age 13 she trotted off to the Seagle Music Colony, the oldest summer vocal training program in the United States, probably the youngest person to attend this program.  Here, she learned about set building, make up, costuming and  took part in plays, musicals and operas.

When she graduated from high school in the largest class ever (33 students), she found a path to Texas, as she hated snow. While attending Texas Christian University she majored in Music Performance and continued to build her performance and production skills . Voice and performance brought attention from renown artists and professors.

Her Journey

Robin Read’s history, rich with stories of success, delivers a message of hard work, business savvy and gutsiness. Immediately after college, she married a photographer who taught her the importance of accounting, operations, along with the mechanics and dynamics of photography.

Divorced after 15 years of marriage, she returned to her dreams. At her first audition after her hiatus she pretended confidence with fear rumbling in her stomach. She won the role, leading to admiration from many in the industry with her peppy personality, acting ability and technical talent. Her theatrical acumen kept her busy with minor and leading film roles. She’s been on the same set with Brad Pitt and Sean Penn and starred as the leading lady for many theatrical performances.  Robin’s entrepreneurial spirit led to voice-overs, commercials, television, film and theater, preventing any “starving artist” experiences.

Robin Buys Holiday Cheer Entertainment

About 20 years ago she joined a singing group, Holiday Cheer Entertainment company, with other trained

Christmas Cheer Singers

Victorian Costumes for Crisp Christmas Weather

singers who perform during the holidays for tree lightings, corporate parties, elevator lobbies, and other venues. Sometimes they sang at elegant, private, holiday parties. Other times they sang outdoors, waiting in the wind and weather for Santa to arrive.

Four years ago the lady who founded the Dallas based group decided to sell. When she asked Robin to purchase the group, Robin thought, Work from home? Flexible schedule? Singing gigs? Christmas joy and cheer for others? Remarkable Robin took the risk.

She loves holiday music, customizing each performance on the spot. For example, if the crowd resonates with children’s laughter, they quickly switch from “Silent Night” to “Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer.”

During the holiday season, life becomes overwhelming, as she is a control freak, a big reason for her success. Before she signs a contract to send a group (usually three to eight singers), the individuals must commit to the event. She chooses the specialized singers based on personality, location, and type of event. Customers return year after year because of her consistent attention to detail.

Off Season

In the off season the singers continue to meet, but not as often. Since she participates in the groups, she understands singing “White Christmas” can cause frigid fingers. She has lined the capes they wear and added hoods. They wear gloves. Who knew owning the group would require her expertise in sewing? She copes with the myriad of staffing issues, such as the mom with a teenager who was rear-ended on the highway, recent divorces, and sudden bouts of laryngitis. She indicated, “My singers are like family. Most of us have been together for years.” She hires, coordinates the schedules, bills the clients, pays the singers, and warms cold hands. She upgrades costumes during the summer, storing them in a special room in her home.

The Rewards

Although her singing groups are paid, it’s not the money that keeps them singing to hustling crowds. The joy she and her singers see as the crowds sing with them, whose faces reflect memories from long ago, and the wide-eyed children which fills the crisp air with cheer. When she chose singing for a career, she had no expectations for the rich rewards she would find bringing holiday happiness to crowds.

Watch for her at a tree lighting or on a street corner with her classically trained, enthusiastic choirs or quartets in their Victorian costumes. Like her on FaceBook Holiday Cheer Entertainment or visit her website to see upcoming events and watch her upcoming company growth. She is adding weddings, birthdays, and other holidays to the repertoire in the future.

The world offers opportunity in the arts for jobs and businesses; however, it takes long hours, hard work, risk taking, revenue building, and talent. Robin Read and Holiday Cheer Entertainment demonstrate careers in singing are possible, but it doesn’t happen without passion and performance. Being an accomplished singer is not enough. A singer without performance is like a writer without readers.

 

 

 

 

Hints for the Holidays

…Helpful hints for the holidays.

Fall dining table

Thanksgiving Table

As I thought about the November issue of Roving Ruth, I wondered how my friends cope with the chaos and pace of the holidays. How can we look serene when people arrive at the Thanksgiving and Christmas tables? Rather than research what others say online, I polled 25 of my friends to see what they would suggest to improve the holiday cheer.

I received ten responses: some sent short replies, all contained serious thought, and one response arrived from a male.  I’m sharing the best comments from each participant. The responses show kindness, wisdom, and humor devoted to our celebrations.

Themes

1) Buy a smaller tree which requires no help from others to trim.

2) Potluck parties.

3) Be kind to yourself; enjoy “time off” to relax.

4) Donate and volunteer.

I asked for two or three sentences and I received enough words for a short story or article.  I was stunned, pleased, and overwhelmed with how to use the insight wisely. Only one person responded with three sentences. I am sending her a small gift of appreciation for the ability to follow directions.

Best Christmas Poll Hints (in random order, slightly edited)

~Several years ago we decided in our extended family of twenty-four, to economize by starting one of those crazy gift exchanges. We created guidelines for letting each person bring one gift to exchange three times before the final stop. We use a pie tin and dice to keep things rolling with laughter and fun.

 ~I do not have family to celebrate with so I decorate the house early and invite my friends for a holiday party the Sunday before Thanksgiving. I am grateful I created my “family.” It sets the tone for the entire season.

 ~One thing I do each year is attend a holiday concert, play or other event with my immediate family or just my husband and I. It’s a brief respite from the chaos that otherwise ensues, and it gives us a few short hours to really enjoy each other’s company in the midst of a hectic time.

 ~I send relatives and friends a Christmas letter telling them we want their presence in our life, not presents.   

 ~I buy boxes of peppermint candy canes and keep them in my purse.  I give them to waitresses, cashiers, postal workers, or anyone I come in contact with…to remind them of the love and care that people still have in this world.  

 ~Now if you are Jewish this is a no brainer.  My sister and family would go to the malls and watch the people hurrying around and just enjoy the view!

 ~Buy a book for everyone on your shopping list or give them your book if they haven’t already read it.  It is so enjoyable. (My favorite, for some reason.)

The Winner of the Christmas Poll Hints

Wagon Wheel Antiques & Gifts Christmas Pole in Calico Rock, Arkansas

Wagon Wheel Antiques & Gifts
Christmas Pole in Calico Rock, Arkansas

Dale Wiley, long-time friend who lives in Florida, is the only man who took the time to answer the following question I posed in the email. In the email to my friends, I asked how to seek help from the spouse. His response resonates for all of us.

~It must be a guy thing about that Christmas tree and not being helpful. It’s not that we don’t want to see a nicely decorated Christmas tree or we don’t want to help. It is what a Christmas tree represents; that the Christmas season is really here again and in our minds it was here not that long ago. We are rarely ready for it to come again. Translation: Now we have to go shopping and there is no way out of this.

 The quote by Edna Ferber just might keep you and the rest of us sane. Christmas isn’t a season. It’s a feeling.

 Thank you, Dale Wiley. Your Gift of the Suitcase (my latest book) is in the mail.

Happy Thanksgiving, Merry Christmas and a Joyous New Year!

The December issue of Roving Ruth is in process.

Five Tips for Family Festivities

xmas dogs

Finding fun in the neighborhood.

Many of our family members live in Houston. We are headed that direction for Christmas family festivities. My husband and I planned to be alone for Thanksgiving; however, we accepted an invitation from friends in Dallas who annually invite their huge family and friends. Everyone brought a dish to share with joy of food, friendship and thankfulness.

The kitchen counters were covered with 20 plus pans of appetizers, turkey, bar-b-que, vegetables, salad, and yummy rolls. Not only did we share dishes I had never tasted (collard greens and strange dressing) but we met their relatives and visited with their neighbors during the event. The teenagers rushed to go first so they would be eligible for second helpings before other guests. Obviously they had attended the feast in prior years.

Now we face Christmas with our family in Houston, looking for the joy and fulfillment of Thanksgiving. In thinking about the diversity of our own family, I’m writing some guidelines for myself. Maybe you need these as much as I do.

Don’t Talk Much

Our adult children run the gamut of strong opinions. My views are rarely appreciated. Their children have electronic devices attached in their faces, except for the three month old. I hereby promise not to announce, “Put the darned devices away for an hour, will you?” I will ignore the whining and complaints as I will be the mousy listener in the room.

Walk Away

If arguments start, I promise to remove myself from the situation rather than enhancing the opportunity for raised voices with a rebuttal. Maybe I can insert, “Let’s leave that for another time.” Humor is not always appropriate, but might be an option.

Enthusiasm

I’ll try to talk individually with each person briefly, except for the baby. The effort may elicit fascinating facts about hair products, piano lessons, soccer, basketball and job challenges.  I’m not sure the grandchildren will want me to interfere with their devotion to devices, but I will try. I hope to listen enthusiastically as they explain what they are watching. Last time I asked one of kids why the river on the video game was red, I was told it was blood.

One Question Only

Let your family members pose the questions and listen carefully for friendly conversations to join. Do not render suggestions unless asked. Your adult children do not want your advice any more than you wanted your parents repeated harassment. I hated hearing my mother’s rants about how thin my sons looked in elementary school.

Since kitchen processes often differ from family to family, I will watch the body language to discern the necessary method for loading dishes or washing pans. The only acceptable question is, “How can I be helpful?” I will ask that, and only that, as the adults know who and what needs to be done.

Call a Friend

One idea I recently read suggests setting a date to call a friend within 48 hours after the family meal to “download” idiosyncrasies from your festivities. Your frustration may dissolve as quickly as the dishwater in the drain as you vent.

Your adult children want your presence, participation and patience with their lifestyles. I want my Christmas festivities as joyful as Thanksgiving.

If you know me, you must be laughing like a circus clown, thinking I can accomplish this. I’m going to try!